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Conferences  

Speakers

Dr. Ali Al-Bayatti Associate Professor in Cyber Security De Montfort University

Bio:

Dr. Ali Al-Bayatti is an Associate professor at De Montfort University. He is the subject leader of Cyber Security at the Cyber Technology Institute. He was awarded his PhD in Computer Science at 2009, and worked with leading organisations such as Deloitte, Airbus, Elektrobit Automotive and Rolls-Royce, among others. Ali's current research is multi-disciplinary, it includes Vehicular Ad hoc Networks, Driver Behaviour, Cyber Security and Smart Technologies that promote collective intelligence. Applications range from promoting comfort to enabling safety in critical scenarios. Ali serves on multiple Editorial Boards and also, is on the Scientific Advisory Boards of multiple institutes in Gulf and Europe. He is also, a visiting professor at multiple institutes and member of the Oman research council. Ali is one of the main factors behind a generated annual income of £1.2 Million at the Cyber Technology Institute.

Talk Abstract:

Multiple components make up a connected car -- hardware, software, mobile applications, cloud and network connectivity. At the heart of this complex mesh is hundreds and millions of lines of code. Each component presents a potential vulnerability, with multiple cases showing how easy it is to compromise vehicles remotely. In just one such example, in 2015, hackers managed to hijack an SUV over the internet through its cellular connection. This presentation will identify automotive cyber security as an evolving field, and discuss how it aims to protect vehicles against malicious attacks. Thus, illustrating how ignoring cyber security puts drivers at risk - making road users more vulnerable as well as providing an opportunity for the loss of private consumer information.

 

Dato' Dr. Haji Amirudin Bin Abdul Wahab Chief Executive Officer CyberSecurity Malaysia
Bio:

Dato' Ts. Dr. Haji Amirudin Abdul Wahab ("Dato' Dr. Amir") is currently the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of CyberSecurity Malaysia, the agency that monitors e-sovereignty of the country. He has more than 25 years of ICT working experience in the telecom and IT sector in the Government as well as in the semi-government and private sectors.

During Dato' Ts. Dr. Amir's leadership as CEO, Cybersecurity Malaysia (CSM) managed to contribute to Malaysia's achievement in attaining top 10 ranking in the world, at International Telecom Union (ITU) Global Cyber Security Index studies and became first Malaysian to chair World Trustmark Alliance (2014-2015). Besides that, during his leadership, CSM was awarded as Best Cyber Security Innovation Award 2015 recipient by FireEye Malaysia and won Champion Prizes at the World Summit of the Information Society (WSIS) for 2 consecutive years (2016 & 2017). He was also selected to receive an ASEAN Award as the Outstanding Chief Information/Security Officer in conjunction with the 10th ASEAN CIO| CSO Summit and Awards 2014 held in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam on 2 December 2014. On 2nd May 2018, he has been registered in Malaysia Board of Technologist as Professional Technologist which has allowed him to use abbreviation "Ts" before his name.

During his leadership, Dato' Ts. Dr. Amir also spearheaded various national and international Cyber security platforms such as serving as the cyber security co-chair in the Cybersecurity working Group for Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP) since 2015, as Permanent Secretariat to Organisation of Islamic Conference Computer Emergency Response Team (OIC- CERT) since 2013, Deputy Chair to Asia Pacific Computer Emergency Response Team (AP-CERT) for 2015 -2019. Dato' Ts. Dr. Amir is a Canadian-based POLCYB (The Society of The Policing of Cyberspace) Non-Executive Board of Directors for year 2015 to 2018. He served as an OIC Task Force Member on ICT and Cyber Security and a Fellow at Malaysian Institute of Management. He was also appointed as Vice-Chair of OIC Science and Technology Committee and Executive Committee Member of Annual Coordination Meeting of OIC Institutions (ACMOI) during the Thematic Committee on Science, Technology and Information Technology meeting which was held in conjunction with Annual Coordination Meeting of OIC Institutions on 7 December 2015 at Jeddah, Arab Saudi. He was also ratified by APEC ECSG on 27 February 2016 in Lima, Peru as an Expert Members for the 2nd APEC E-Commerce Business Alliance (ECBA) Expert Council (2016-2018) in which he was one of its Deputy Chairman. Dato' Ts. Dr. Amir was also appointed as Advisory Board Member of The Economist Intelligence Unit on Asia Smart City Program 2016.

Nationally, Dato' Ts. Dr. Amirudin is a currently the Chairman of National ICT Standard Committee (ISCG) since Mar 2010 till current. He is also a Chairman of Board of Governance Global Accredited Cyber Security Education or Global ACE Scheme for Malaysia Chapter and past Head of Secretariat to the National IT Council NITC chaired by YAB PM from 2010-2012. He is currently a Board Member of Technology Park Malaysia (TPM) IT Sdn Bhd since 2016 and also used to sit as a Board member to Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation (MDeC) and MyNIC Berhad during 2011-2012 period in addition to the past Computer Industry Association of Malaysia (PIKOM) Council or Board Member from 2014-2015.Dato' Ts. Dr. Amir holds a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) from the School of Information Technology & Electrical Engineering (ITEE), University of Queensland, Australia. Dato' Ts. Dr Amir also holds two Master degrees, a Masters in Business Administration (MBA) from the University of Duqubue, Iowa, USA, a Masters in Information Technology from National University of Malaysia (UKM) and a Bachelor of Science Engineering in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA.Academically, Dato' Ts Dr. Amir is an Adjunct Professor at the International Islamic University of Malaysia (UIAM), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP) and Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM) and was one at Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN) Malaysia and currently also serves as a Board of Studies Member of the Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP), University Malaya (UM) and Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM).

A calculated risk-taker with deep technical industry knowledge, Dato' Ts. Dr. Haji Amirudin had built a strong reputation for developing effective and unique strategies and incubating new models and designs. He maintains a well-deserved national and international reputation in his field where he had been invited as keynote speakers and panellist in various local and international conferences and featured regularly in the various local TV, Radio, newspapers, magazines and online medias. He was conferred the Dato 'Paduka Mahkota Perak (D.P.M.P) by His Royal Highness the Sultan of Perak, Sultan Nazrin Muizzuddin Shah, who brought him the title Dato' on 5 November 2016.

Talk Abstract:

Internet penetration has surpassed 55% global population mark. This number indicates that more than 4.5 billion of people has access to the internet. While this exhibits that the world is highly connected, has better access to information and networking, it acts as an occasion for criminal to embark their illicit activities and make use of technology especially internet to broaden their potential victims globally and grow their profits. As the world is embracing emerging technologies such as 4th Industrial Revolution, Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence and many more, the numbers of threats are significantly growing and cyber attacks are becoming daily news. Ransomware attacks and data breaches are among top cyber incidents dominating global concerns while at the same time, numbers of cyber security professionals are still low. A research done by CyberSecurity Ventures shows that there are 3.5 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs by 2021, putting the world in risky environment. The presentation will explain how CyberSecurity Malaysia, a national cyber security technical agency prepares a holistic approach namely adaptive security at the national level to safeguard Malaysia's cyber space and continue making Malaysia as a cyber resilient nation.

 

Dr. Marc Dacier Full Professor, Digital Security Department Head EURECOM, France
Bio:
Past Professional Experience From 1989 until 1991, he worked at the University of Louvain, Belgium, as a researcher. From 1992 until 1994, he was a member of the dependability group, at LAAS-CNRS in Toulouse (France) working on his PhD thesis in the "Dependable Computing and Fault Tolerance" group on quantitative evaluation of operational computer security. In 1995, at Firstel, Paris, he worked on several security related projects as an external security consultant for France Telecom in Paris (France) and the French ministry of interior. From 1996 until 2002, he worked for IBM Research, in Zurich (Switzerland) as a Research Staff Member (RSM) and became the founding manager of the Global Security Analysis Lab (GSAL). He obtained an IBM Outstanding Technical Achievement Award for the contributions of his research to the business of IBM Global Services. In addition, the GSAL team pursued several projects in the intrusion detection domain that led to the creation of the new Tivoli Intrusion detection product, namely Tivoli Risk Manager, the very first-to-market SIEM platform. His team completed the technology transfer to Tivoli and kept providing new features, derived from their ongoing research, to the Tivoli development team during the following years. Similar technology transfer also happened successfully with the Managed Security Services group located in Sterling Forest (USA) in the context of their centralized intrusion detection alerts correlation offering for IBM customers. This fruitful collaboration led also to the completion of the PhD thesis of Dominique Alessandri and Klaus Julisch, from IBM Zurich Research. From 2002 until 2008, he worked as a professor at Eurecom, Sophia Antipolis (France) within the Corporate Communications Department. During that period, he taught the lectures on networking and operational network security. He also was very successful in obtaining funding for several European and French projects and grew his team accordingly. From 2008 until 2014, he worked for Symantec Research Labs, and managed several groups in France, Ireland and in the United States. His teams constituted the Collaborative Advanced Research Department (CARD) within Symantec Research Labs (SRL). CARD focused on innovation and development of next-generation technologies. In addition to internal advancements, Dr. Dacier's teams collaborated on joint projects with external government agencies, universities and businesses on mostly long-term projects. The technical domains involved include network security (honeypots, BGP, etc.), cyber security intelligence extraction, natural language processing, automated machine translation, big data analytics and critical infrastructure protection. In that role, he spent two years in California (USA), from August 2011 until July 2013. While in the USA, he was instrumental in restructuring Symantec Research Labs as a whole and in defining and putting in place a Research Development Life Cycle to better select, implement and transfer, to the business units, the results of long-term research projects in order to have bigger impact on the company. This work led to the consolidation of Symantec Research Labs into a single organization as opposed to the externally vs. internally funded teams that were composing SRL before. He also worked during 6 months on a major growth plan for Symantec Research to move from 35 people to 300. His plan included the definition of new labs, of new processes to align with business units, of new organizational methods. All relevant VPs and the CEO approved the plan but the forced departure of the CEO and the following restructuring of the company aborted its implementation. He came back to France in August 2013 to focus on the European teams in this new, global, organization he had contributed to define while in the USA. From 2014 until 2017, he worked for the Qatar Computing Research Institute (QCRI / HBKU) in Doha, Qatar, as director of the cybersecurity research group that he was hired to create from the ground up. The initial plan was to have 50 members in that group but drop in the oil price together with the Saudi blockade eventually reduced QCRI's ambitions. Its mission was to carry out applied and impactful research. His role, besides the scientific leadership, included hiring the needed scientists and engineers, increasing the visibility of the team, defining and implementing a long-term research vision and strategy, strengthening the relationship with the local stakeholders and improving international collaborations with key players in the world. When he left, he had built a very strong team of 19 members, 11 scientists and 8 software engineers working along three major research axes: i) threat identification, analysis and mitigation, ii) cyber intelligence and iii) critical infrastructures security. A number of local and international collaborations have been established under his guidance, notably with Texas A&M, Qatar University, CMU-Q, British Columbia University (Canada), the University of Michigan and the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (USA), the Institute of Software Application Technology, Guanzhou and the Academy of Science (China). Results of some of the projects have led to numerous publications in top tier conferences but also to the creation of prototypes to be tested by local stakeholders such as Qatar Airways, Ooredoo, Kahramaa, Qatar Petroleum, etc. Future collaborations were being discussed, notably with Siemens in the context of securing the Qatari water mega reservoirs project. Since October 2017, he is back at Eurecom as a full professor and, since July 2018, as the acting department head of the digital security group. On top of his research and teaching activities, he is in charge of all industrial partners (BMW, IABG, Orange, Monaco Telecom, SAP, Symantec) composing the private Eurecom Group of Economic Interest. In that role, he also has frequent contacts with Eurecom academics partners (Aalto Univ. [Finland], Chalmers Univ. of Tech [Sweden], CTU [Czechia], IMT [France], NTNU [Norway], Politecnico di Torino [Italy], TUM [Germany]) Teaching Experience Since 1997, while working for IBM research, he has ben giving as an invited researcher, an intrusion detection seminar at the University of Louvain (UCL, Belgium), Namur (FUNDP, Belgium) and Liège (ULG, Belgium) and at the ENSEEIHT in Toulouse (France). In 2002, he has received the title of invited professor at UCL and adjunct professor at ULG where he kept teaching until the 2011-2012 academic year. He was a professor at Eurecom within the Corporate Communications Department at Eurecom from July 2002 until March 2008. He taught networking and operational network security related lectures. Until August 2014, he remained an adjunct professor at Eurecom and kept teaching a 42 hours lecture there, while being employed by Symantec. He also has kept supervising semester projects as well as internships of Eurecom students from 2008 until 2014 and was the main advisor for several PhDs students. In 2016, he helped in creating the Master of Cybersecurity at the newly founded Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU) in Doha, Qatar. Among other things, he defined and taught, with members of his team, the networking and computing security lecture (42 hours). Since 2018, he teaches a hands-on course on networking (42 hours) as well as the "secure applications" lecture at Eurecom (21 hours). Major research interest Computing security, in its broader acceptance, represents his major research interest. He made seminal significant contributions in the area of quantitative evaluation of operational security, intrusion detection, events correlation, security intelligence extraction, honeypots, BGP hijacking analysis. He also supervised work being carried out in his teams in the area of quality assessment of automatically translated text, natural language processing techniques, pre and post editing for noisy text translation, big data analytics algorithms. Throughout his career, he paid attention to maintain a good balance between the formalization and validation phases of the research cycle. He always considered that a sound, rigorous and repeatable experimental validation phase is a prerequisite to obtain trustworthy and meaningful results. This is why, to promote the pursue of a sound scientific approach for cyber security, he created the Worldwide Intelligence Network Environment (WINE) at Symantec and made it available to external researchers from academia in order to enable them to run reproducible experiments on real world, representative, security event data feeds. Visibility, membership, committee He has cofounded in 1998, with Kathleen Jackson from the Los Alamos National Lab, the symposium on «Recent Advances on Intrusion Detection» (RAID), now considered to be one of the main conferences in this area and, since then, renamed "Research on Intrusions, Attacks and Defenses". He has chaired its steering committee for 20 years. He was PC co-chair of RAID 2016 and is PC chair for its 20th edition in 2017. He also was the co-director, with Brian Randell from the University of Newcastle, of the MAFTIA European Project. He has been the technical coordinator of the European funded WOMBAT project. His team at Symantec was involved in a number of externally funded projects in Europe (CRISALIS, VIS-SENSE, BIGFOOT, ACCEPT, ConfidentMT) as well as in the United States (MINESTRONE, MEERKATS, NICE).nual income of £1.2 Million at the Cyber Technology Institute.
Talk Abstract:
It is well known that malware spreading over the Internet aim at transforming vulnerable devices into bots that can be misused by attackers. These armies of bots constitute what is common called "botnets" and they are given tasks (such as spamming, ddosing, etc..) to do through a "command and control" infrastructure (C2C). Identifying and neutralizing these C2C has been the subject of an arms race between white and black hats for years. In this talk, we will briefly explain how C2C works and how they have been (and still are being) detected. We will then present some very strange results obtained when studying BGP announcements over a period of several years. BGP is the de facto standard for Internet routing. BGP hijacks attacks seem to be happening routinely without anyone complaining about it. We will present the reasons why this could be happening and explore the possibility that this might be the symptoms of the activity of a brand new generation of C2C not discussed so far, an extremely stealthy and sophisticated one. This still remains an open conjecture though that would require some more research to reach a positive, or negative, conclusion.

 

Prof. Narasimha Reddy J.W.Runyon Professor Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Texas A&M University

Bio:

Narasimha Reddy is currently a J.W. Runyon Professor in the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Texas A&M University as well as the Associate Dean for Research with the Texas A&M Engineering Program and the Assistant Director of Strategic Initiatives & Centers with the Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station.Reddy received a B.Tech. degree in Electronics and Electrical Communications Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India in August 1985, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in May 1987 and August 1990, respectively.Reddy's research interests are in Computer Networks, Storage Systems, Multimedia Systems, and Computer Architecture. During 1990-1995, he was a Research Staff Member at IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose. Reddy's work had an impact on the design of multimedia servers, storage systems, measurement based security mechanisms in routers, DOS/DDOS detection and botnet detection. Reddy holds five patents and was awarded a technical accomplishment award while at IBM. His honors include an Outstanding Professor award by the IEEE student branch at Texas A&M during 1997-1998, an Outstanding Faculty award by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering during 2003-2004, a Distinguished Achievement award for teaching from the Former Students Association of Texas A&M University, and a citation "for one of the most influential papers from the 1st ACM Multimedia Conference".

Talk Abstract:

As mobile devices, sensors and other non-compute devices dominate in numbers on Computer Networks and the Internet of Things (IoT) emerges, protecting these devices from cybersecurity threats is becoming more and more important. This talk will look at the current trends in this evolution and will highlight the importance of securing IoT devices on the network. We will describe a number of approaches and techniques for improving the cyber hygiene of these devices and will articulate a "zero trust" model of connecting devices to networks.

 

Dr. Juan Manuel Director of European Digital Innovation Hub
Bio:
Juan Manuel Corchado (born May 15, 1971 in Salamanca, Spain) is Full Professor with Chair at the University of Salamanca. He was Vice President for Research and Technology Transfer from December 2013 to December 2017; Director of the Science Park of the University of Salamanca and Director of the Doctoral School of the University until December 2017; he has also been elected twice as the Dean of the Faculty of Science at the University of Salamanca. In addition to a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Salamanca, he holds a PhD in Artificial Intelligence from the University of the West of Scotland. Juan Manuel Corchado is Visiting Professor at Osaka Institute of Technology since January 2015 and Visiting Professor at the Universiti Malaysia Kelantan. Corchado is the Director of the European IoT Digital Innovation Hub; Director of the BISITE (Bioinformatics, Intelligent Systems and Educational Technology) Research Group, which he founded in the year 2000; President of the AIR Institute; Academic Director of the Institute of Digital Art and Animation of the University of Salamanca. He has been the President of the IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics Spanish Chapter. He also oversees Master´s programs in Digital Animation, Security, Blockchain, IoT, Mobile Technology, Information Systems Management and Agile Project Management at the University of Salamanca. Corchado has supervised more than 25 PhD theses, he is the author of over 800 peer-reviewed research papers and books, he has chaired the scientific committees of more than 30 international conferences, and is also Editor-in-Chief of Specialized Journals, such as The Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal; The Sensors Journal (Intelligent Sensors); The Oriental Journal of Computer Science and Technology; and Electronics (Computer Science & Engineering).
Talk Abstract:
Industry 4.0 is a revolutionary concept that is helping to change the industry by digitizing its production processes and increasing its productivity. Internet connectivity lies in the very core of Industry 4.0; it enables us to connect all the devices within a factory, creating a fully connected system that collects data and employs artificial intelligence algorithms to analyze them. With the fourth industrial revolution, the need for manpower in factories will become lower, while industrial processes will become more efficient. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the driving force behind global development and it is therefore an extremely topical subject. The ever-greater developments in the field of artificial intelligence have sparked many debates about its role in different sectors (society, business, government, etc). AI began as a fantasy about the future but now we truly have everything we need to make it a reality; computing power, storage capacity, communications technology and qualified manpower. We can optimize our industry by incorporating AI into its production processes. However, it is important to bring Blockchain into Industry 4.0, due to its countless advantages. Blockchain is essentially a form of ledger keeping that makes data unalterable and indestructible. Although it is commonly thought of as the technology behind different cryptocurrencies, such as bitcoin and ether, Blockchain can be used to secure anything, including manufacturing processes; by preserving the integrity of data, it prevents cyber-attacks and increases security. Edge Computing is another, highly relevant technology for Industry 4.0. It streamlines the traffic coming from IoT devices and provides real-time local data analysis. Instead of a centralized data-processing system, the EC paradigm processes the data at the edge, that is, as close to the source of data as possible. Thus, the sensors and smart applications/devices deployed in a factory can process the data in real time; as soon as they are generated. Thus, Edge computing accelerates data-streaming and eliminates latency. Moreover, it reduces Internet bandwidth usage, eliminating costs and ensuring that applications operate correctly in remote locations; this is an important aspect for factories. The ability to process data without ever storing it in a public cloud is another layer of security, nevertheless, the edge must also be protected against cyber-attacks. To sum up, AI, blockchain and edge computing must all be encompassed within the Industry 4.0 concept. These three technologies are allies and complement each other. AI models and blockchain-based distributed systems should be adapted to satisfy the needs of Industrial IoT; this will provide some alternatives for the merging of these three technologies. Security, reliability, rigorous time response and smart solutions are the elements that characterize our modern factories and production centers. To build more efficient and productive systems, it is necessary to integrate those technologies and actively counteract potential cyber-security risks.

 

Prof. Hamido Fujita Director of Intelligent Software System Laboratory, Chair Professor at Faculty of Software and Information Science Iwate Prefectural University, Iwate, Japan
Bio:
Director of Intelligent Software Systems Laboratory to design new software techniques based on cognitive interaction between human and machines, and intelligent decision making based on Medical Knowledge for medical decision making application.
Talk Abstract:
Discovering patterns from big data attracts a lot of attention due to its importance in discovering accurate patterns and features that are used in predictions for accurate biomedical information for better security.Biometrics provides a suitable robust authenticated identification based on feature extraction for verifiable data. Physiological Analytics are either morphological or biological. Finger prints, hand or face shapes, facial analysis, vein pattern, iris and retinal feature in the eyes, walking steps patterns, are all different pattern morphological biometrics for authentication purposes used in pattern recognition, Behavioral analytics is also another type of biometrics based authentication, like voice recognition, signature dynamics, keystrokes, gait, sound of steps and gestures, etc., and all these are used to measure individual behaviors and rhythm, for example stress or other type of behavior related to aggressive act in bank or in crowd. All these different types of biometrics have different reliability for variety of purpose. This talk provide new direction on the state of art on Physiological Analytics (PA) due to its stability in providing better authentication, not affected by stress like in the behavioral ones.PA provides techniques to extract patterns (features) from faces based data; or fingerprint data based analytics to extract features related to features in the face or palm veins or geometry in the hands, or iris recognition, and retina. In this talk I will focus on face recognition and fingerprints analytics, and its current state of art. The challenges in big data analytics for facial analytics and fingerprints based data are of high dimensionality and complexity in data representation for feature extraction. Also it has class imbalance in multiclass classification problem. Conventional approaches in machine learning are not providing accurate authentication process in robust feature extraction for object like beard or hear color change. In this talk I will present the current state of art and focus it on face recognition main problems in deep learning and multiclass classification in feature selection.

 

Dr. Kui Ren Innovations in IoT security: From Continuous Biometrics to Trustworthy Manufacturing
Bio:
Kui Ren is Professor and Associate Dean of College of Computer Science and Technology at Zhejiang University, where he also directs the Institute of Cyber Science and Technology. Before that, he was SUNY Empire Innovation Professor at State University of New York at Buffalo (UB). He received his PhD degree from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Kui's current research interests include Data Security, IoT Security, AI Security, and Privacy. He received IEEE CISTC Technical Recognition Award in 2017, SUNY Chancellor's Research Excellence Award in 2017, Sigma Xi/IIT Research Excellence Award in 2012, and NSF CAREER Award in 2011. Kui has published more than 250 papers in peer-reviewed journals and conferences and received several Best Paper Awards, including ACM AsiaCCS'18, IEEE ICDCS'17, IWQoS'17, and ICNP'11. His h-index is 65, and his total publication citation exceeds 25,000 according to Google Scholar. Kui is a Fellow of IEEE, a Distinguished Scientist of ACM.
Talk Abstract:
The human-to-machine (H2M) interaction provides critical interference for many Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications. Securing the H2M interaction is a key to a trustworthy IoT ecosystem (e.g., smart home and wearables). In this talk, I will present two recent advancements. The first enables next-generation user authentication. The human cardiac motion was identified as the unique individual fingerprint, and we develop a high-sensitive and distortion-free continuous radar sensor to remotely capture the cardiac displacement over time and thus provide continuous user authentication. The second is about 3D printing security in manufacturing highly flexible and customized IoT devices. The proposed system harnesses the unclonable process variation in 3D printing manufacturing and leverages the corresponding geometry imperfection as the unique product signature.

 

Dr. Abdallah Khreishah Associate Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering
Bio:
Abdallah Khreishah received his Ph.D and M.S. degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Purdue University in 2010 and 2006, respectively. Prior to that, he received his B.S. degree with honors from Jordan University of Science & Technology in 2004. During the last year of his Ph.D, he worked with NEESCOM. In Fall 2012, he joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering department of NJIT as an Assistant Professor and promoted to Associate Professor in 2017. His research spans the areas of network security, machine learning, wireless networks, visible-light communication, vehicular networks, and cloud & edge computing. His research projects are funded by the National Science Foundation of USA, New Jersey Department of Transportation, and the UAE Research Foundation. He is currently serving as an associate editor for several International Journals. He served as the TPC chair for WASA 2017, IEEE SNAMS 2014, IEEE SDS -2014, BDSN-2015, BSDN 2015, IOTSMS-2105. He has also served on the TPC committee of several international conferences such as IEEE Infocom. He is a senior member of IEEE and the chair of the IEEE EMBS North Jersey chapter.
Talk Abstract:
Towards computationally efficient adversarial training defense against adversarial examples attacks to neural networks classifiers Due to their descent performance in approximating different latent distributions from data, Neural Network (NN) classifiers gain wide adoption in different complex tasks, including natural language processing, computer vision and cyber security. However, the underlying assumption of attack free operating environment has been defied by the introduction of adversarial examples – carefully perturbed samples of input that are usually misclassified. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to develop defenses against adversarial examples, however, existing approaches are still far from providing effective defenses to mitigate this continuously evolving problem. Some of the existing defense approaches rely on training with existing adversarial examples, and hence are inefficient in training and in mitigating new types of adversarial examples. While, many others utilize randomness to defend adversarial examples but are shown to be impractical or inefficient. In this talk, we introduce the concept of adversarial examples and review several state-of-the-art approaches to generate these attacks and defend against them. We show that these methods lack the ability to dynamically control the trade-off between classifying original and adversarial examples and also require too much computation to generate iterative adversarial examples during training. After that we present our recent adversarial training methods in making the defense more practical. In the first method we propose a GAN based defense against adversarial examples, dubbed GanDef. GanDef is designed based on adversarial training combined with feature learning. As a GAN model, GanDef is realized based on a classifier and a discriminator which form a minimax game that can dynamically change the sensitivity of adversarial examples by modifying a threshold on the fly to achieve a dynamic trade-off between classifying original and adversarial examples. In the second method, we propose a GAN based zero-knowledge adversarial training defense, dubbed ZK-GanDef. Compared to the state-of-the-art zero knowledge defenses, ZK-GanDef applies a more flexible regularization on prediction logits by using the discriminator. This results in the highest test accuracy in classifying different white-box adversarial examples when compared to state-of-the-art zero knowledge defenses. To further reduce the computation, our third approach is a single-step adversarial training method that can efficiently mitigate adversarial examples with low training overhead. This new approach flattens iterative adversarial examples into single-step adversarial examples in multiple consecutive training epochs. At the end of the talk we will also discuss several future directions and research opportunities in this emerging field of research.

 

Dr. Salah Sadou Systems of Systems: an Emerging Technology with Emerging Security Issues
Bio:
Salah Sadou is a full professor in Computer Science. He leads the interdisciplinary research of the Cybersecurity Center of UBS and the Trustworthy computing department of ENSIBS engineering school. He obtained a PhD degree in 1992 at Ecole Centrale de Lyon, France. He has about 30 years of experience in research and education in software engineering science. His past research interests were centered on languages, processes and tools for designing and engineering systems where the evolution acts as a first class entity. He was also involved in research concerning architectural description language with non‐functional properties as first class entities, software restructuring (from object‐oriented to component‐oriented), component‐based description languages and software quality. He directed 12 PhD students (mean time to completion 3 years and 3 months) and currently supervising 5 PhD students most of them related to Cybersecurity domain. His current research interest focus mainly on secure by design approach for System of Systems and Socio‐technical System construction.
Talk Abstract:
Using existing systems to build a new system is very usual in certain domains. Such a system is called System of Systems (SoS). In system engineering domain, SoS is a concept that exists for a while and the existing systems (subsystems) are mainly physical systems. Combining software systems with physical ones makes it possible to cover a much wider domains of applications than those covered by system engineering alone or software engineering alone. However, this emerging technology comes with its share of security issues. For example, the aim by combining subsystems is to have emerging behaviors available at the SoS. However, by definition this type of behavior can not be provided by any single subsystem. So, even though the subsystems are all safe we have no guarantee regarding the level of security of the emerging behaviors they produce. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight some security problems caused by SoS and point out some interesting research directions to solve them.

 

Dr. Dan Dongseong Kim
The University of Queensland, Australia
Bio:
Dr. Dan Dongseong Kim is an Associate Professor (softly equivalent to a full professor in North America) at The University of Queensland (UQ), Brisbane, Australia. Prior to UQ, he led the Cybersecurity Lab. at the University of Canterbury (UC), Christchurch, New Zealand from August 2011 to Jan 2019. He was a Senior Lecturer in Cybersecurity in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at UC. From June 2008 to July 2011, he was a postdoc in Chaired Prof Kishor S. Trivedi's research group at Duke University, North Carolina in the US. He received a Ph.D. (security for sensor networks) from Korea Aerospace University in 2008. He was a visiting scholar in Prof Virgil D. Gligor's research group at the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland in the US in 2007. He was the general co-chair of The 24th Australasian Conference on Information Security and Privacy (ACISP2019) and the general chair of The 22nd IEEE Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing (PRDC 2017). He is an editorial board member of the Elsevier Computers & Security since 2018 and serves as a program co-chair of IEEE TrustCom2019, IEEE ICIOT2019, ATIS2017, GraMsec2015, IEEE DASC2015 and program committee member of international conferences including IFIP/IEEE DSN, ISSRE, SRDS, ICC CISS. Dr. Kim’s research is being supported by the New Zealand’s MBIE (IoT security), the US Army Research Lab (Moving Target Defense), and the Agency for Defense Development (Attack/Defense modeling) in South Korea. His research interests are in automated cybersecurity modeling and analysis for the Internet of Things, Cloud computing, and Moving Target Defense. Please visit his research group webpage
Abstract:
Talk title: Graphical Cybersecurity Modeling and Analysis Graphical security models have been used to assess and improve cybersecurity. First, I will talk about the UQ cybersecurity group and my research areas in automated cybersecurity modeling and analysis. Second, I will talk about how graphical security Measurement, graphical security Models and Security Metrics (3M) are used to assess the cybersecurity of networks and systems. Third, I will talk about how those 3M are used to evaluate and develop novel defense mechanisms named moving target defense. Lastly, research revenues in the graphical security modeling and assessment will be introduced.